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After Wednesday’s post about my protest jewelry purchase, I was curious about how jewelry has been used to make statements throughout history – beyond the plastic political pins we are all familiar with.

Reading more about jewelry and the suffrage movement, I found that women would advertise their cause with pins, rosettes, brooches, sashes, etc. I kind of already knew this thanks to the “Sister Suffragette” song in Marry Poppins. However, according to Vogue, wealthy women could buy “Suffragette Jewellery” from Mappin & Webb (high-end jewelry store in London). These pieces were gold brooches and pendants with emeralds, pearls, and amethysts – representing the official colors of the struggle, green (give), white (women), and violet (the vote).

In the 1950s-1960s, jewelry promoting political candidates was especially popular. However, a quick Google search will show plenty of jewelry pieces supporting more recent political figures.

 

Estate Vintage Rhinestone Screw Back EARRINGS Marked by Maker Political Memorabilia for Dwight Eisenhower for Campaign 1950's Collectible

IKE earrings – Etsy

I also found that jewelry was another way to show one’s allegiance to a political party.

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c1940s – Ruby Lane

Vintage 1950's GOP Elephant Lapel Pin Republican Political Memorabilia Metal Pin

c1950s – Etsy 

 

 

Political jewelry is not just for women, men show their support with cufflinks and tie clips.

 

Image result for vintage political cufflinks

Cufflinks – Etsy

Image result for fdr tie tack

Tie Pin – Etsy

Jewelry has also been a way to show our pride and patriotism for our country. I remember seeing a lot of rhinestone American flag pins after 9/11. I also see a lot of red, white, and blue jewelry on the 4th of July.

 

Art Deco Rhinestone USA Flag Pin Red White Blue Silver Gold Tone Brooch 1016DGZ

Art Deco Rhinestone Pin – Etsy

When I think of statement jewelry, it’s usually in the context of a bold necklace, big earrings, or an awesome bracelet stack. With the current political environment and my resulting political activism, statement jewelry has taken a whole new meaning.

~Emily